King Motorsports Unlimited, Inc. - Mugen Performance Products for Honda and Acura

Baking the Mugen RR Advanced Concept

If you've ever been to one of our Dyno Day events, you may have met Kojima San. He travels out every year from Mugen HQ in Tokyo to visit with us, talk to attendees about their cars, and share news from Mugen. So when this year Dyno Day landed on Kojima San's birthday, we knew we had to celebrate in style. We were also unveiling the Mugen Civic RR Advanced Concept (shipped all the way out from Tokyo) and it made for a great opportunity to commission a cake creation as one-of-a-kind, unique and masterfully constructed as the RR.

We looked to Michael Kinjerski, a legend when it comes to Honda cakes (See some of his other Honda cakes here). His son Dustin is a long time friend of King's too.

Here are the photos and the notes Michael shared with us:


This is the total construction of the Mugen Civic RR Advanced Concept car from baking the cake to prep work to sculpting and decorating, leading to the finished product. You've seen the finished product, now you'll see what it takes to put this cake together.

Baking the cake using Betty Crocker Super Moist:

Wrap after baking then put into the freezer:

Prep the cake board:

Cut out a foam board template to 1/12 scale of the car:

Utilize template to begin stacking the cake:

Layering the cake with frosting against the foamboard template until the car shape is covered completely in buttercream frosting:

Templates to the exact size are made for all 4 sides:

Templates are pinned to all sides and outlined:

Mugen Civic starting to take shape:

The finished product! This cake took about 5 hrs to decorate not including the baking and other prep work. We even added a "Happy Birthday" message in Japanese to Kojimo San. I 'm honored and humbled to do this project and based on the reaction it was well received. Thank you so much for the opportunity!

Kojima San being surprised with the cake at Dyno Day!:

Hondafest NW 2016: Iron Sharpens Iron


Collaborating remotely for King Motorsports from Oregon has its pros and cons. On the downside, I don't get out to Wisconsin to see the shop, cars and staff as often as I'd like to. But on the upside, I get to experience the car culture of the Pacific Northwest, with its own unique blend of Mugen-inspired vehicles. And there a few unicorns I have yet to see in person.

Last weekend I set the alarm for 5am and hit the road by 6am for the three hour drive to Hondafest NW at Pacific Raceways just southeast of Seattle. Hondafest NW is an annual Honda and Acura car show put on by NW Motiv. This year there would also be drag races and autocross.

Pacific Raceways has a 2.25-mile road course, drag strip, and plenty of asphalt for autocross crafting. Somehow this entire facility is hidden away by Washington's treescape, and it reminds me of visiting Trees of Mystery. Except there are a gazillion Hondas in line trying to get in.

This line of Honda and Acuras of all ages and levels of polish are 3 wide and maybe a half mile long, but is thankfully moving along.

The roll-in is a glorious chorus of enthusiastic revving, the kind you only do when you are with your own kind and in the middle of the woods with nobody to complain. Mostly we have raspy tenors but there is the occasional baritone and bass. The smell of fuel reminds me of the Dyno Day roll-in at King Motorsports-- my favorite part of the event.

I glance at my fuel meter a few times. We've all been in line about 30 minutes, maybe more? In the lane next to me a maroon Civic sedan starts to ooze white smoke out of the hood just after the passengers offload a custom lowrider adult tricycle off the roof.

Having somewhat misjudged my bathroom breaks, I start glancing around for a porta-john, considering if I should give up my place in line, pull over, and take a break. Just then I catch a glimpse of bright blue in my rearview mirror, about 20 cars back-- Bill Master's EP3 was maneuvering into the special entrance reserved for show cars. Following closely were Mel Diego's white EP3 and Huy Hoang's red DC5. It was then I knew it would be a good show. The long drive here would definitely be worth it.

A few minutes later, I had paid and was turning into the VIP parking area. Helpful event staff guided us on exactly where to park, and that seemed to help keep things organized. I parked my black EP3 next to a nicely sorted black RSX, loaded up my backpack, grabbed my camera and headed for the show car corral by way of the restrooms.

The show cars were a really interesting mix. Quite a good mix of RSX, Integra and Civics. There was a healthy showing of Accord and Prelude, plus a few old school CRX and very early gen Civic hatchbacks. Someone brought their Odyssey, and I even found a very clean CRV. There were a few NSX there too.

The variety is what I love about one-make car meets. Normally a dude with a chopped-up Del Sol wouldn’t consider shining up his car to show at an event for fear of getting the stink eye. But show up to a Honda event with said Sol, and you are instantly family. Sure they may look at you like you are the oddball uncle, but you're still family and people are glad you showed up. Tell me more about how you turned this Honda into a bamboo-lined tropical cabana, Uncle Steve.

I run into Jerimiah Styles, who has just completed the installation of his Mugen aero kit on his white 2nd gen Integra. He’s showing his car and has recently swapped his bronze MF8s for time attack RNRs. His car is looking great and the King Motorsports sticker on his windshield nabs him a bonus +5 HP.

He introduces me to Mel and Bill, who have the only two EP3s in the show. Their builds are legends here in the Pacific Northwest. Mel generously gives me a tour of his white 2003 Civic Si hatch, something I’d been looking forward to. This car is so well-known that it’s usually the first image that comes up when you Google “EP3.” Mel is an old friend of King’s CEO Scott, having worked closely together to assemble Mel’s Mugen wish list.

Mel points out all his parts and describes each with care. He moves along swiftly from part to part, because there is just so much to show off. Full JDM front bumper conversion. Type-R headlights and side skirts, Mugen front lip and radiator duct, Mugen wing, Mugen seat rails, Mugen Twin Loop, Mugen hood, a custom-modified Mugen roll cage that is so well integrated with the OEM interior that it looks like the plastics had been molded exclusively for the cage. His Mugen grill is properly painted with a black background to add extra dimensionality. His CAI draws air from behind the driver side opening on his Mugen lip.

“It’s the details,” he says. And he’s right. Because I also own an EP3, I can process the walkaround at the speed the details are hitting my ears. And I can also appreciate how rare these parts are. I’ve only seen a few of these Mugen pieces on one other car, and that’s the Mugen EP3 in the King Motorsports showroom.

Mel describes the stages of his car’s evolution as “Chapters.” He’s on Chapter 2 now. Chapter 3 involves adding Mugen MF10 17x8, Mugen brakes and Mugen seats. “With some luck and the help of King Motorsports, that will be the final chapter,” he declares. Something tells there will still be an amazing Chapter 4.

Parked next to Mel is Bill’s turbocharged 2003 Civic Si, equally stunning in the dedication and hard work put into it. You can tell these two have influenced each other and made each other’s builds better. Bill also has many of the same Mugen parts and JDM upgrades, but his build still feels distinct. He points out that his paint is actually a remixed, brighter version of Honda’s already vibrant Vision Blue Pearl. Now that he points it out, I’ll never be happy with Honda’s blue again. His version really is so much better.

Having followed Bill on Instagram I’ve seen that his day job is a woodworking magician, creating the HGTV-worthy kitchen and home remodels. That same craft and precision finds its way into his EP. My friend Julio points out the custom bracing for the motor mounts and the custom re-routed AC lines. They were so well done I didn’t even notice them. Overall there is a strong sense of restraint with Bill’s EP build. It feels curated, like he methodically chose only the best of the best parts and mods, the ones that would still be impressive and relevant decades later.

Parked next to Bill is Huy’s turbocharged 2003 RSX Type-S – aka REDRUM1. This car has all the shine of a Mugen show car fused with the raw functionality of a gutted and purpose-built race car. It sits right on the elusive line between show car and race car. Huy treats me to a guided walkaround, and I am floored. I find it hard to comprehend the amount of time, skill and resources that went into this vehicle.

Huy has an elusive perfect balance of finances + skill + taste that produces something masterful. If you only have finances + skill, you might go overboard on the mods. If you only have skill + taste, you probably restore a car to its original glory. If you have finances + taste, you go buy an NSX. But if you have all three – you build the DC5 elevated to what must be its perfect functional and aesthetic balance.

Like the artist he is, Huy tells me the build started with one thing – the desire to fit a specific set of wheels. To do that, he had the fenders masterfully pulled out and the whole car widened. Everything else flows from there. There is a reason Super Street called it “one of the best Honda builds to date!”

Huy brought two other cars with him, a white Mugen-equipped DC5 and a gorgeous green EK hatch. He tells me that the Autoart Mugen DC5 1:18 die-cast model was his inspiration for his white DC5, and I can see the similarities. It hits me that he’s actually creating big-scale, functional model kits, which in turn are replica of full scale cars. It is life imitating art imitating life. This loop produces impressive refinement in Huy’s hands.

Iron Sharpens Iron

It’s no coincidence that Mel, Bill and Huy are parked next to each other. They are friends outside the car show too, parking their beloved rides in each other’s home garages from time to time. These three friends have sharpened and pushed each other to create functional works of art.


More info:

Mel Diego’s 2003 Honda Civic Si
Instagram: @hur1cne@hov

Bill Master’s 2003 Honda Civic Si
Instagram: @siborg_ep

Huy Hoang’s 2003 Acura RSX Type-S
Instagram: @wiiizzer

Full set of photos from Hondafest NW:

Vintage Catalogs - King Motorsports Unlimited

We recently came across an OG customer who had all three catalogs that King created in the late 80s / early 90s. Each of these hand-assembled catalogs was called a Volume and included a carefully curated collection of Mugen parts, King parts, information about Mugen, and information about King's racecars and services. Each include thoughtful introductory letters written by King's CEO Scott and are a terrific snapshot of Honda/Acura performance culture at the time.

Because we don't spend much time looking in the rear view, we actually didn't have these Volumes anymore in our own library of literature. In fact we only printed about 1000 of each Volume. So Bill Yoon generously loaned the Volumes to us (including the price list inserts) for us to scan and make available to share with our friends!

Click an item below to download the PDF scan.

King Motorsports Unlimited Catalog Volume 1

KMS Volume 1.pdf (4.43 mb), Circa 1989

KMS Volume 1 Price List.pdf (1.11 mb)

King Motorsports Unlimited Catalog Volume 2

KMS Volume 2.pdf (5.24 mb), Circa 1991

KMS Volume 2 Price List.pdf (909.23 kb)

King Motorsports Unlimited Catalog Volume 3

KMS Volume 3.pdf (3.79 mb), Circa 1993

KMS Volume 3 Price List.pdf (2.24 mb)

CR-Z Brake Upgrade with DC5/RSX Calipers

At King we love adding performance to the CR-Z. We even had the one-of-a-king Mugen CR-Z: RR Concept Vehicle shipped out from Tokyo for our 2012 Dyno Day.

In our shop recently: We made this CR-Z go fast with an HPD supercharger. Now it's time to make it stop fast as well! On go a pair of rebuilt RSX calipers, Powerslot rotors and Hawk HP+ pads. Rotor size goes from the stock 10.3" to 11.81" with the RSX rotors. Now it stops as well as it goes!!! This is a great upgrade for any CR-Z.

Fakespotting: Mugen Sports Pedal Kit 46545-XG5-K2S0

The following post comes to us courtesy of Mugen aficionado Jerimiah Styles!

== ==

The Mugen sport pedal kit is one of the more commonly replicated parts found on the market today. Let's go over some tell tale signs to identify real from fake. In this post we'll look at a specific pedal kit that is available for the CRX, Del Sol, '90-'05 Civic, Integra, RSX, TSX and a few more. Suffice it to say this is a very common pedal kit:

Mugen Sports Pedal Kit (MT): 46545-XG5-K2S0

We'll start with the authentic Mugen kit. Notice the orange tape on the clutch and brake pedals and white tape on the gas pedal. The high quality of the aluminum is also a sign that you have a genuine Mugen product. Notice the Mugen logo on the brake/cluth is a single line with kanji and MUGEN.

Now, let us compare the replica version. Red tape has replaced the orange, and we have a finish on these that is noticeably different than the genuine Mugen set. You will also notice that the logo is different on the brake/clutch -- kanji is stacked above MUGEN -- however this does not determine authenticity. The older sets of genuine Mugen sport pedals did indeed have this insignia on them. They are referred to by some as first generation sport pedal kits, highly sought after by Mugen collectors.

A look at the authentic Mugen accelerator pedal shows the high quality of the aluminum.

A look at the back of the replica accelerator pedal shows the difference in quality and tell tale red tape of the replicas (versus white tape on the genuine). The overall shape of the fake pedal is more jagged and slightly larger. The fake pedal does not install the same as the Mugen -- which is riveted or screwed on. Keep in mind the fake is a brand new, out of the box set -- far from the craftsmanship of its authentic counterpart.

Next let's look at the Mugen brake and clutch pedal (these two Mugen pedals appear to be identical). Again the orange tape and the part number is on the bottom of the real ones.

Now the replica. There's that red tape again, and notice the lack of part number and "Made in Japan" stamp.

This particular kit was available in the two types of packaging you see below (which are both genuine). The clear window box is the most commonly seen replica package. Some replica packages even include a photocopy of the genuine installation instructions, making them even harder to spot. Since the replica packages so closely resemble the genuine ones, the best way to tell fake from real will be to inspect the pedals themselves.

The cardboard box version was available via Honda dealers and has a different part number (but is the same kit).

== ==

Why does it matter?

Replica pedals are known to come apart due to inferior manufacturing and materials. This is extremely dangerous and can cause slippage on the pedal -- or worse -- interfere with pedal operation. Imagine not being able to press the brake pedal because the accelerator cover is lodged behind it!


Want to make sure you get genuine pedals that won't fall apart on you? Buy from an authorized Mugen dealer like King Motorsports.

Thanks again to Jerimiah for his insight and we look forward to more posts from him!

** UPDATE **

Since we published this post, we've had some questions about the variations within the genuine Mugen pedals. Over time, Mugen improved and modified their manufacturing process and the design of the pedals. Enthusiasts have identified three distinct "generations" of pedals: Gen 1, Gen 1.5, and Gen 2. Below is a comparison chart that helps identify the various generations of genuine Mugen pedals.

Genuine Mugen Sport Pedal Generation Comparison

Mugen Official Company Profile Sheet Circa Early 1980s

Right-click to see this sheet at full size!


The text:


Hirotoshi Honda
Son of Dr. Soichiro Honda well known. Industrial designer and racing car builder.

Chief design & mechanic:
Masao Kimura
Formerly with Honda racing service center Co., Ltd. Builder of over 15 different racing cars & racing motorcycles. Winner of a total of over 50 races.

Capital stock ¥ 80,000,000
Established March 1973
Land area 6,600m²
Plant space 2,700m²
No. employee 80

We specialize primarily in the design, manufacture, testing and sales of motor sports parts and special racing machine (motorcycle and automobile, both 2cycle and 4cycle) for the Honda manufactured products, and participation in the various races with our products.

Mugen products manufactured by highly skilled personnel with the most up-to-date equipment and developed from extensive research, long experience and rigid testing under many years of gruelling races are used widely by both professionals and general enthusiasts throughout the world.

In the Shop: EK Civic Race Car (Updated)

In the shop recently we are preparing an EK Civic SCCA STL race car. First up- TIG welding door bars:

Next- AIM MXL data aq unit mounted in a very cool carbon fiber inlay:

Dashboard mock up. Check out the KMS custom fabricated adjustable steering shaft....

Just a few more bars and this EK Civic STL roll cage will be complete. Next step is all the tin work to separate the fuel cell from the drivers compartment.

Just a few more bars and this EK Civic STL roll cage will be complete. Next step is all the tin work to separate the fuel cell from the drivers compartment.



Finishing up work bulkhead work on the SCCA STL Civic race car. All aluminum panels are hand fit and then bead rolled for strength. The center section is attached with self ejecting DZUS fasteners for easier access to the fuel cell, fuel pump etc. All other panels are pop riveted in place.

The SCCA STL Civic heads to the body shop today for paint. Back in a few weeks for final assembly! Big thanks to Kyle Gessler of Gessler's Auto for the outstanding service!

Call us today for custom roll cages, race prep and fabrication!

Hondata K-PRO: Ordering, Unboxing & Installation


Earlier this year I purchased the K-PRO (version 3) engine computer tuning solution made by Hondata, Inc. This modified ECU would open up my 2002 Civic Si (EP3) to performance tuning. While there are a couple engine tuning solutions available for my car, the Hondata K-PRO is the most common and well-supported. I’ve seen King’s skillful dyno tuning and was looking forward to having some tuning done to make the most of my car’s modest modifications.


To prepare, I picked up an un-modified ECU for my EP3 -- the PNF version, which is the same as what comes with the EP3. I bought this ECU second hand, from a reputable seller. Placing the order with King Motorsports was easy. Scott
from King pointed me to a form to fill out and send in with my ECU to Hondata’s facility in Torrance, California. Scott had to fill in some paperwork on his end as well so that Hondata would be prepared for my ECU.

Once Hondata’s technician received my ECU, they tested that it functions properly. Then they open up the metal case and add their daughterboard to the main board. This new board is about a quarter the size of the main Honda board and fits snugly inside the case – allowing the ECU case cover to fit back on as it originally did. Hondata also cuts a small square opening into the side of the ECU case to allow for the USB port connection. As a final step, they closed the ECU back up, test it, and put a HONDATA sticker across the top of the case.

I also purchased a used laptop that runs Windows. I installed the free KManager software ( from Hondata on it. The laptop and Hondata software will allow tuning of the K-PRO ECU via a USB cable. I reviewed Hondata’s installation and KManager tutorials online.


A Fedex package arrived swiftly from Hondata. Inside the box:

* USB cable
* Serial input harness for data logging (I didn't need to hook this up for my needs)
* KManager software on CD (you can also download this online for free)
* Hondata license plate frame and stickers
* Printed materials and a note to relocated the ground strap on intake manifold






Installation was fairly straightforward. Here were my steps on my EP3 (your steps my be different):

1. Disconnect battery.
2. Remove the passenger side foot well trim panel. You should see the ECU. Carefully release and remove the harnesses leading to the ECU.
3. Bend or remove upper glove box “stoppers” to allow the glove box to swing completely open.
4. Use a 10mm socket to remove the 3 bolts holding the ECU in place. 1 bolt is behind the glove box, and 2 bolts can be removed from underneath the glove box.
5. You should now be able to remove the ECU.
6. Install your K-PRO ECU in place. Installation is reverse of the removal. Make sure the harnesses are securely clicked into place.
7. Before you close up the glove box, plug the USB cable into your K-PRO. I used a few zip ties to keep it from accidentally pulling out and let the rest of the USB cable rest inside the glove box.
8. Per the included note from Hondata, I relocated the battery ground strap from my intake manifold to the valve cover bolt. All that was required to do this was a 10mm socket. The existing ground strap is long enough for the relocation.
9. Reconnect the battery.
10. Turn the key to on (but do not start the engine).
11. Make sure your laptop has successfully installed KManager, and launch KManager. Then plug the USB cable into laptop. You can now upload one of the base maps provided by Hondata.
12. The next steps only apply if your K-PRO conversion was performed on a second hand ECU:
13. Using KManager, disable the immobilizer.
14. In order to have the immobilizer matched (progrmamed) to my ECU: I scheduled a service appointment at my local Honda dealer. My service advisor understood what a K-PRO is and what I was trying to accomplish. I drove to the dealer with the immobilizer disabled. Once there, I used my laptop to re-enable the immobilizer. This is an important step. If you don’t re-enable the immobilizer, the Honda tech’s equipment will not be able to locate and program your immobilizer.








Q: Where can I get more information on the benefits and compatibility of the K-PRO system?

Hondata’s website has a lot of good information and is updated regularly:

Q: Is the K-PRO only for heavily modified cars?

While the K-PRO conversion is well suited for turbo/ supercharger applications and K-series engine swaps, it can also help extract power from basic bolt-on parts such as a performance header, exhaust system and air intake.

Q: What is an immobilizer?

An immobilizer is an electronic security device installed by Honda that prevents the engine from starting unless the correctly paired/programmed key (with immobilizer chip) and ECU are present. It prevents a car from being stolen by a thief bringing his own generic key or ECU.

Q: Do I have to buy a 2nd ECU or can I just send the one in my car?

You can send the ECU that is currently in your car. There are pros and cons to doing that.


PROS: You won’t have to reprogram your immobilizer (assuming you want it enabled). And you can be certain the ECU is fully functional. There is also a cost savings since you won’t be buying a second ECU.


CONS: Your car will have a few days of down time since obviously your car will not be running while the ECU is being modified by Hondata. If you ever want to sell the K-Pro or return to a stock ECU, you will need to buy a stock ECU.

Hondata can also provide a brand new ECU at additional cost when you order. 

Q: What is the big deal about buying from an authorized Hondata dealer?

Simply put, buying from an authorized Hondata dealer like King Motorsports protects you. Hondata has issued a warning that there are counterfeit K-PRO ECUs in circulation:

In 2014 a Florida man was charged by the FBI for having Hondata devices reverse engineered, then built in China and sold as authentic. He generated approximately $58k in income with his scam, so you can only imagine how many fake Hondata devices he put into circulation.

Hondata also warns of a scammer from Texas named Daniel Sanchez who claims to be authorized to sell on behalf of Hondata but is not a Hondata dealer. He has also spread some misinformation about Hondata. More info:

Q: What’s the difference between a Hondata Reflash and a K-PRO?

A Reflash is a reprogramming of your ECU by Hondata. Rather than installing a full daughter board into your ECU case, Hondata reprograms your ECU directly to extract more power with pre-determined changes such as altered cam timing and optimized fuel settings. The cost is significantly less than the full K-PRO conversion, but is not customizable for your car’s specific mods.

More info about the Reflash:

You can always upgrade from a Reflash to the full K-PRO at a later date.

Q: Can I upgrade to a newer version of K-PRO?

Hondata has been very good about consistently updating the K-PRO hardware and software systems. While the software updates are free, the hardware updates are not. Hondata has a program that will allow you to purchase an upgraded K-PRO conversion by sending in your working, older K-PRO ECU.

Q: What kind of laptop do I need to run KManager?

Right now nearly any Windows laptop or netbook will work, including older ones running Windows Vista or newer. A desktop computer will work too, but has obvious portability limitations. A Mac OS will work as well if you have a compatible Windows emulator. Some have even used certain models of the Windows Surface tablets (the ones that run the full Windows 8, not Windows 8 RT). I was able to buy a used Acer netbook from our company’s IT department for about $50. KManager does not take very much CPU power to run, so older laptops will work just fine so long as they meet the software’s minimum operating requirements.




King Motorsports is an authorized Hondata dealer. Buy with confidence online or by phone at (262) 522-7558:




Here is a side-by-side comparison of a stock ECU (left) and the K-PRO conversion (right):





In the Shop: Custom Fab Roll Bar for DC2-R

This week we wrapped up custom fabrication on a roll bar for an Integra Type-R (DC2-R).

The goal was a safe and strong roll bar with minimal cutting to the original interior. The roll bar is bolt-in, so removal won't be a headache (unbolt, replace a few plastic trim panels, and we're back to stock).

Specs: 1.5 x .120 DOM, TIG welded and powder coated semi gloss black. The finished result looks factory!

King Motorsports can fabricate top-shelf custom roll bars, cages and more for your Honda or Acura -- give us a call at 262.522.7558!

Dyno Day 2014: Recap

This year's annual event brought together people and cars for another great celebration of Honda automobiles! We put a lot of effort into putting together a fun and safe event and were happy to see this year bring in a great caliber of cars to show off. And a great caliber of people too!

In this recap we've assembled some voices and photos from Dyno Day 2014!


First up, a message from Scott Z (President of King Motorsports Unlimited):

Dyno Day 2014 was a huge success! Our biggest yet! Amazing cars from all over the country, an impressive turn out of ITR's with an estimated 700+ in attendance! Wow!!

We would like to give a shout out to the staff at King Motorsports:
Mike S.

And our volunteers:

With special thanks to our MC, HondaPro Jason!

Without their over the top help we could not have made this event happen!

And thank YOU for all your support through the years!

Can't wait for 2015!



Next a recap from a regular Dyno Day attendee and King fan Calvin Quam:

New Berlin, WI was the place to be on June 29th, 2014!

With the weather working in everybody's favor after some early morning drizzle, the sun came out as the cars and spectators rolled in to the largest "Honda" gathering for Wisconsin. With more cars than parking, people came from all over to be apart of it all. License plates from over 16 states could be found on several Honda platforms, not including a few from Ontario. Many of these out of state plates came on one of the most lusted after chassis, the Integra Type R. Thanks to ITR Expo 2014 being held the following Monday and Tuesday at Road America(Elkhart Lake, Wi), many of the participants to that event came a day early to check out Dyno Day '14.

One unlucky ITR owner who drove from Florida had an unfortunate mishap, bending several valves on the way to the show. To the amazement of many onlookers, the head was removed for a parking lot valve replacement during the show. The smiles and cheers of joy when it fired to life were priceless, making you proud to be part of such a great car community with enthusiasts helping each other.

High revving dyno pulls, well-built show cars and great food provided by local Boy Scout Troop 93 are just a few things that make this show put on by King Motorsports so memorable. Events like these show any automobile enthusiast what its all about and grows us as a community. Put this show on your list of events to attend next year, I promise you won't regret it!


This black NSX was the winner of the STAFF PICK award, selected by the King staff and Hondapro Jason:

Here is a pic with the winners of the coveted King Motorsports Unlimited Dyno Day 2014 lowest horsepower award -Tracy and Dan Geiger and their awesome original paint Z600. They took home the "Turbonator" for extra hp!


Recap from Honda celebrity and this year's event emcee, Hondapro Jason:

I like to help and volunteer when I can, so I asked Scott at King Motorsports if he would like some help on Dyno Day 2014. His response was "Yes! Would you like to emcee the event?" I agreed and at 8:15am I arrived after a 2 hour trip to King. I got all my 'gear on' then went to 'work'!

We wanted to bring a more personal feel to this year's Dyno Day. So armed with a microphone and loudspeakers, I interviewed the owners of some cars while standing next to their rides. This brought crowds around and really showcased some of the cars that would normally just get pictures taken and walked by.

The show this year had so much energy and love from the community. Scott and I were thanked about 500 times from various people. I enjoyed the show because you can see everything from a modded NSX to a showroom condition 1971 Z600.

While there were many highlights from the show, one thing stood out: An unfortunate event that happened to a guy named Craig. His timing belt broke on his B18 motor 40 miles from the King. This lead to everyone watching him rebuild the head and replace the valves; while working in the parking lot on a lunch cooler. "I couldn't of picked a better place to break down. They (King Motorsports) had all the parts I needed," said Craig.

That is a story I will be telling for a while!


Thanks and see you next year!

Many thanks to our official 2014 event photographer, Nick Hanson!

Check out more pictures of the event at Noggs Photography too! (Thanks Andy!):

Noggs has a couple photos of Craig's parking lot repairs!

Couldn't make it to this year's Dyno Day? Be sure to make it to next year's event! Sign up for our newletter at and LIKE our Facebook page to be the first to know when next year's event date is announced!