Hondata K-PRO: Ordering, Unboxing & Installation

by perry_w 1. January 2015 15:35


Earlier this year I purchased the K-PRO (version 3) engine computer tuning solution made by Hondata, Inc. This modified ECU would open up my 2002 Civic Si (EP3) to performance tuning. While there are a couple engine tuning solutions available for my car, the Hondata K-PRO is the most common and well-supported. I’ve seen King’s skillful dyno tuning and was looking forward to having some tuning done to make the most of my car’s modest modifications.


To prepare, I picked up an un-modified ECU for my EP3 -- the PNF version, which is the same as what comes with the EP3. I bought this ECU second hand, from a reputable seller. Placing the order with King Motorsports was easy. Scott
from King pointed me to a form to fill out and send in with my ECU to Hondata’s facility in Torrance, California. Scott had to fill in some paperwork on his end as well so that Hondata would be prepared for my ECU.

Once Hondata’s technician received my ECU, they tested that it functions properly. Then they open up the metal case and add their daughterboard to the main board. This new board is about a quarter the size of the main Honda board and fits snugly inside the case – allowing the ECU case cover to fit back on as it originally did. Hondata also cuts a small square opening into the side of the ECU case to allow for the USB port connection. As a final step, they closed the ECU back up, test it, and put a HONDATA sticker across the top of the case.

I also purchased a used laptop that runs Windows. I installed the free KManager software ( from Hondata on it. The laptop and Hondata software will allow tuning of the K-PRO ECU via a USB cable. I reviewed Hondata’s installation and KManager tutorials online.


A Fedex package arrived swiftly from Hondata. Inside the box:

* USB cable
* Serial input harness for data logging (I didn't need to hook this up for my needs)
* KManager software on CD (you can also download this online for free)
* Hondata license plate frame and stickers
* Printed materials and a note to relocated the ground strap on intake manifold






Installation was fairly straightforward. Here were my steps on my EP3 (your steps my be different):

1. Disconnect battery.
2. Remove the passenger side foot well trim panel. You should see the ECU. Carefully release and remove the harnesses leading to the ECU.
3. Bend or remove upper glove box “stoppers” to allow the glove box to swing completely open.
4. Use a 10mm socket to remove the 3 bolts holding the ECU in place. 1 bolt is behind the glove box, and 2 bolts can be removed from underneath the glove box.
5. You should now be able to remove the ECU.
6. Install your K-PRO ECU in place. Installation is reverse of the removal. Make sure the harnesses are securely clicked into place.
7. Before you close up the glove box, plug the USB cable into your K-PRO. I used a few zip ties to keep it from accidentally pulling out and let the rest of the USB cable rest inside the glove box.
8. Per the included note from Hondata, I relocated the battery ground strap from my intake manifold to the valve cover bolt. All that was required to do this was a 10mm socket. The existing ground strap is long enough for the relocation.
9. Reconnect the battery.
10. Turn the key to on (but do not start the engine).
11. Make sure your laptop has successfully installed KManager, and launch KManager. Then plug the USB cable into laptop. You can now upload one of the base maps provided by Hondata.
12. The next steps only apply if your K-PRO conversion was performed on a second hand ECU:
13. Using KManager, disable the immobilizer.
14. In order to have the immobilizer matched (progrmamed) to my ECU: I scheduled a service appointment at my local Honda dealer. My service advisor understood what a K-PRO is and what I was trying to accomplish. I drove to the dealer with the immobilizer disabled. Once there, I used my laptop to re-enable the immobilizer. This is an important step. If you don’t re-enable the immobilizer, the Honda tech’s equipment will not be able to locate and program your immobilizer.








Q: Where can I get more information on the benefits and compatibility of the K-PRO system?

Hondata’s website has a lot of good information and is updated regularly:

Q: Is the K-PRO only for heavily modified cars?

While the K-PRO conversion is well suited for turbo/ supercharger applications and K-series engine swaps, it can also help extract power from basic bolt-on parts such as a performance header, exhaust system and air intake.

Q: What is an immobilizer?

An immobilizer is an electronic security device installed by Honda that prevents the engine from starting unless the correctly paired/programmed key (with immobilizer chip) and ECU are present. It prevents a car from being stolen by a thief bringing his own generic key or ECU.

Q: Do I have to buy a 2nd ECU or can I just send the one in my car?

You can send the ECU that is currently in your car. There are pros and cons to doing that.


PROS: You won’t have to reprogram your immobilizer (assuming you want it enabled). And you can be certain the ECU is fully functional. There is also a cost savings since you won’t be buying a second ECU.


CONS: Your car will have a few days of down time since obviously your car will not be running while the ECU is being modified by Hondata. If you ever want to sell the K-Pro or return to a stock ECU, you will need to buy a stock ECU.

Hondata can also provide a brand new ECU at additional cost when you order. 

Q: What is the big deal about buying from an authorized Hondata dealer?

Simply put, buying from an authorized Hondata dealer like King Motorsports protects you. Hondata has issued a warning that there are counterfeit K-PRO ECUs in circulation:

In 2014 a Florida man was charged by the FBI for having Hondata devices reverse engineered, then built in China and sold as authentic. He generated approximately $58k in income with his scam, so you can only imagine how many fake Hondata devices he put into circulation.

Hondata also warns of a scammer from Texas named Daniel Sanchez who claims to be authorized to sell on behalf of Hondata but is not a Hondata dealer. He has also spread some misinformation about Hondata. More info:

Q: What’s the difference between a Hondata Reflash and a K-PRO?

A Reflash is a reprogramming of your ECU by Hondata. Rather than installing a full daughter board into your ECU case, Hondata reprograms your ECU directly to extract more power with pre-determined changes such as altered cam timing and optimized fuel settings. The cost is significantly less than the full K-PRO conversion, but is not customizable for your car’s specific mods.

More info about the Reflash:

You can always upgrade from a Reflash to the full K-PRO at a later date.

Q: Can I upgrade to a newer version of K-PRO?

Hondata has been very good about consistently updating the K-PRO hardware and software systems. While the software updates are free, the hardware updates are not. Hondata has a program that will allow you to purchase an upgraded K-PRO conversion by sending in your working, older K-PRO ECU.

Q: What kind of laptop do I need to run KManager?

Right now nearly any Windows laptop or netbook will work, including older ones running Windows Vista or newer. A desktop computer will work too, but has obvious portability limitations. A Mac OS will work as well if you have a compatible Windows emulator. Some have even used certain models of the Windows Surface tablets (the ones that run the full Windows 8, not Windows 8 RT). I was able to buy a used Acer netbook from our company’s IT department for about $50. KManager does not take very much CPU power to run, so older laptops will work just fine so long as they meet the software’s minimum operating requirements.




King Motorsports is an authorized Hondata dealer. Buy with confidence online or by phone at (262) 522-7558:




Here is a side-by-side comparison of a stock ECU (left) and the K-PRO conversion (right):





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King Motorsports | Miscellaneous | Product Reviews

In the Shop: Custom Fab Roll Bar for DC2-R

by Administrator 7. October 2014 10:58

This week we wrapped up custom fabrication on a roll bar for an Integra Type-R (DC2-R).

The goal was a safe and strong roll bar with minimal cutting to the original interior. The roll bar is bolt-in, so removal won't be a headache (unbolt, replace a few plastic trim panels, and we're back to stock).

Specs: 1.5 x .120 DOM, TIG welded and powder coated semi gloss black. The finished result looks factory!

King Motorsports can fabricate top-shelf custom roll bars, cages and more for your Honda or Acura -- give us a call at 262.522.7558!

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Around the Shop | King Motorsports | Miscellaneous

Dyno Day 2014: Recap

by Administrator 3. July 2014 18:58

This year's annual event brought together people and cars for another great celebration of Honda automobiles! We put a lot of effort into putting together a fun and safe event and were happy to see this year bring in a great caliber of cars to show off. And a great caliber of people too!

In this recap we've assembled some voices and photos from Dyno Day 2014!


First up, a message from Scott Z (President of King Motorsports Unlimited):

Dyno Day 2014 was a huge success! Our biggest yet! Amazing cars from all over the country, an impressive turn out of ITR's with an estimated 700+ in attendance! Wow!!

We would like to give a shout out to the staff at King Motorsports:
Mike S.

And our volunteers:

With special thanks to our MC, HondaPro Jason!

Without their over the top help we could not have made this event happen!

And thank YOU for all your support through the years!

Can't wait for 2015!



Next a recap from a regular Dyno Day attendee and King fan Calvin Quam:

New Berlin, WI was the place to be on June 29th, 2014!

With the weather working in everybody's favor after some early morning drizzle, the sun came out as the cars and spectators rolled in to the largest "Honda" gathering for Wisconsin. With more cars than parking, people came from all over to be apart of it all. License plates from over 16 states could be found on several Honda platforms, not including a few from Ontario. Many of these out of state plates came on one of the most lusted after chassis, the Integra Type R. Thanks to ITR Expo 2014 being held the following Monday and Tuesday at Road America(Elkhart Lake, Wi), many of the participants to that event came a day early to check out Dyno Day '14.

One unlucky ITR owner who drove from Florida had an unfortunate mishap, bending several valves on the way to the show. To the amazement of many onlookers, the head was removed for a parking lot valve replacement during the show. The smiles and cheers of joy when it fired to life were priceless, making you proud to be part of such a great car community with enthusiasts helping each other.

High revving dyno pulls, well-built show cars and great food provided by local Boy Scout Troop 93 are just a few things that make this show put on by King Motorsports so memorable. Events like these show any automobile enthusiast what its all about and grows us as a community. Put this show on your list of events to attend next year, I promise you won't regret it!


This black NSX was the winner of the STAFF PICK award, selected by the King staff and Hondapro Jason:

Here is a pic with the winners of the coveted King Motorsports Unlimited Dyno Day 2014 lowest horsepower award -Tracy and Dan Geiger and their awesome original paint Z600. They took home the "Turbonator" for extra hp!


Recap from Honda celebrity and this year's event emcee, Hondapro Jason:

I like to help and volunteer when I can, so I asked Scott at King Motorsports if he would like some help on Dyno Day 2014. His response was "Yes! Would you like to emcee the event?" I agreed and at 8:15am I arrived after a 2 hour trip to King. I got all my 'gear on' then went to 'work'!

We wanted to bring a more personal feel to this year's Dyno Day. So armed with a microphone and loudspeakers, I interviewed the owners of some cars while standing next to their rides. This brought crowds around and really showcased some of the cars that would normally just get pictures taken and walked by.

The show this year had so much energy and love from the community. Scott and I were thanked about 500 times from various people. I enjoyed the show because you can see everything from a modded NSX to a showroom condition 1971 Z600.

While there were many highlights from the show, one thing stood out: An unfortunate event that happened to a guy named Craig. His timing belt broke on his B18 motor 40 miles from the King. This lead to everyone watching him rebuild the head and replace the valves; while working in the parking lot on a lunch cooler. "I couldn't of picked a better place to break down. They (King Motorsports) had all the parts I needed," said Craig.

That is a story I will be telling for a while!


Thanks and see you next year!

Many thanks to our official 2014 event photographer, Nick Hanson!

Check out more pictures of the event at Noggs Photography too! (Thanks Andy!):

Noggs has a couple photos of Craig's parking lot repairs!

Couldn't make it to this year's Dyno Day? Be sure to make it to next year's event! Sign up for our newletter at and LIKE our Facebook page to be the first to know when next year's event date is announced!


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Dyno Day | King Motorsports

1989 Civic Si USDM Restoration: Travis Weaver's EF Time Machine

by Administrator 18. May 2014 17:23

We always enjoy sharing the passion that goes into our customer builds. A typical product of that passion? Countless hours of wrenching. But the lesser-celebrated outpouring of skill, perserverance and resourcefulness? That comes in the form of the hunt for parts. In the case of Travis Weaver of the Pacific Northwest, a hunt for 20-year-old OEM and Mugen parts took him around the USA, then internationally. He became so good at it, he even made a living at it for a time.

Travis recently shared a pic of his Mugen EF exhaust - which he said took him nine years to find. Nine years! That got our attention, and we contacted him for his story.


My older brother first got me into Honda's back in the late 1990's when he purchased a teal colored 1992 Civic VX. He ended up swapping in a JDM B16A engine with a GSR tranny back around late ‘98. We had a lot of fun at the local street races in our early teenage years. I eventually bought my first Civic as well in 1999. It was a 1990 Civic STD 4 speed. Back in the earlier days they were largely frowned upon due to their square, boxy look.

I eventually sold my first car and purchased a 1990 Civic Si in 2002. I fell in love with that car. From when I first purchased the car, I wanted to do a complete JDM EF9 conversion on it after seeing pictures of one in California. In the earlier days if you wanted to find parts you were limited to your local importer (which typically only sold engines), eBay, or do what I did and contact a wrecker overseas and import parts yourself. I found a company in Malaysia back in 2003 with a complete EF9 front clip. With a very risky bet, I sealed the deal and five long months later had my first JDM clip complete with B16A and EF9 conversion. I ended up painting the entire car Milano Red and was the first local person to do a JDM EF back in 2003.

I eventually landed a job working for the largest indoor Honda/Acura Auto wrecker/JDM engine importer in 2005. Soon after I became their Inventory Manager and JDM parts specialist -- which was a great experience but after a few years I got tired of killing Hondas and became more focused on preserving and restoring them.

A few years later -- feeling the pressure of the economy and the unsure feeling of my own personal future -- I decided to sell my 1990 Si. It ended up going to a good home to a guy in East Coast Canada. I must say it was the biggest mistake that I made. I ended up driving a Mitsubishi 3000GT for a few months to focus on school but I got the itch again. I had so many regrets and so many things that I dreamed about doing to my old Si that I decided to start from scratch and do a full 1989 Civic Si USDM restoration. That way I can do things right the first time and go in a slightly different direction so it would not be like history repeating itself. Now I specifically chose the 1989 Civic Si because in the USA it was a one-year-only car, much like the 1997 Integra Type-R. I began to put out ads looking specifically for an ‘89 only.

Eventually I found a good clean shell with perfect seats, straight body and in overall great shape. The only problem is the engine was bad. I rented a trailer and made the three hour drive in the snow to buy the car. Upon arriving the owner informed me it still ran but made a horrible noise from the timing belt area. I towed it back and had my mechanic Thomas Strom diagnose the problem. Turned out to be a bad water pump. With a new factory pump and timing belt, mixed with a valve adjustment, I gave this 1989 Civic Si a new chance at life with 187k miles on her. I sold my 3000GT and with further inspiration from Thomas I decided to make a goal, take my time and stick to it.

My goal was to do a complete factory restoration on the car. We began tracking down rare USA accessories along with new old stock (NOS) parts from Honda. Almost all of the parts were either discontinued or no longer available. I then started contacting specific dealers to see if they had old inventory that was never reentered into the system when Honda changed its part numbers from HondaCode to what we have today. After I exhausted all of my resources here in the States, I then turned to Google Translators. I began contacting dealers all over the world. I managed to source new rare parts from Malaysia, Germany, UK, New Zealand, Spain, Japan, and even Canada – despite the challenge of different part numbers and inventory systems with many of them.

I used to have a Mugen addiction with my original 1990 Civic Si but finding parts for an EF were very hard and very expensive. I was able to source a real EF9 Mugen header along with some Mugen RNR's and a set of MR5 Final Versions. The one item I could not find was a Mugen EF exhaust. I managed to find two different ones that popped up for sale between 2006-2008 but was outbid both times on Yahoo Auctions. With my current restoration I told myself that I have to be true to both the year and the USDM theme that I am going for. It becomes a slippery slope once you diverge from your intended goal. All was fine until my good friend Moe from EFparts presented me with a USDM brochure from 1988 which showed the Mugen CF-48's as a factory option for the fourth gen. I knew that the pre 87's were offered with some Mugen goodies but this little piece of Honda literature gave me a valid excuse to go MUGEN WHORE again while still maintaining the factory look.

I managed to secure a set of crusty 14" CF-48's with aero discs and preceded to restore them. I have been keeping in touch with a few owners of the Mugen EF exhausts over the years in the event that they may want to part ways with it. Eventually I got a taker and finally brought home my current exhaust. Soon after I decided to give Scott Zellner a call at King Motorsports to discuss the Mugen spring rates offered with the sports suspension. After chatting with him for almost an hour he informed me he had two new sets of the old Mugen suspension still in stock. I could not believe that after all these years they were still around. I quickly purchased both new sets.

I could not be happier with how everything turned out for this build. I now have a true time machine that to me represents what Honda of North America was all about.

You can also follow the car's progress on Facebook. I created a page specifically for it here:


Here are pictures Travis shared with us from his build! Thanks Travis, we can't wait to see what you do with it next!

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Customer Rides | King Motorsports | Mugen | Vintage & Nostalgia